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2013
10
Feb

Django Unchained Movie Review

Django Unchained Movie Review

Director Quentin Tarantino is no stranger to taking on controversial themes. He’s built his career on being able to wield those blunt instruments, and Django Unchained is one of his greatest achievements. In many ways, Django Unchained picks up where Inglourious Basterds left off, given its historical setting and enormously dramatic presentation. Fans of Quentin Tarantino may wonder where he will be going next, and if this is part of a pattern for him and his films.

Django Unchained is undeniably a Quentin Tarantino film, with many of the director’s signature styles, which his fans will appreciate and which will help him stand apart from other filmmakers for the uninitiated audience members that are seeing their first major Quentin Tarantino film. The cinematography is great as usual for Tarantino, and the plot is tight and energetic. Django Unchained has attracted some controversy, like many of Quentin Tarantino’s other films, but it has also been his most financially successful film. The controversy related to Django Unchained certainly doesn’t seem to have generated too much harmful publicity for the film. Django Unchained is one of the rare films that captivate both critics and audience members.

The notion of gladiatorial combat between nineteenth-century American slaves is a grim commentary on American slavery. Django Unchained has a heightened reality to it, with similar exaggerations about American slavery that manage to be even more revealing. Tarantino’s use of artist license with the film and its setting manages to serve the film well. People with a historical interest in this time period may be drawn to the film Django Unchained on those grounds alone, but it certainly won’t be inaccessible for people just looking to be entertained. Being able to attract an audience on both ends of that spectrum is impressive, and is certainly one of the great successes of Django Unchained.

Jamie Foxx stars as Django Freeman and delivers a very compelling performance that keeps you rooting for him throughout the whole film. Christoph Waltz certainly added more intrigue to the film, and became one of the film’s most interesting characters. Samuel L. Jackson gives an unexpected but compelling performance as an obedient house slave to the film’s villain. Leonardo DiCaprio’s performance as the villain Calvin J. Candie was downright frightening. Kerry Washington did what should could with a relatively minor role, although her character didn’t have much of an opportunity to stand out amongst the dramatic events happening around her. Overall, the cast certainly made the film emotionally engaging and kept the viewers invested in the events of the film.

Anyone who is familiar with Quentin Tarantino’s films know how violent they tend to be, and that may be off-putting for some members of the audience. Tarantino certainly does not sanitize the depictions of violence, which some people may find daring and realistic and other people may find sensationalist, especially given the setting. The action scenes in the film will be gripping enough that people who want their films fast-paced will be captivated. Most of Quentin Tarantino’s legions of fans should certainly enjoy Django Unchained, although the film may be able to reach a broader audience than some of his other films. Tarantino is a director willing to extend himself in new directions, which Django Unchained demonstrates yet again.

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